Tag Archives: Conservation

Amphibians in the City

Amphibians are a key indicator species of ecosystem health. Their presence or absence can tell us a lot about the general health of a wetland or riparian area in addition to giving us a sense of site water and habitat quality. When climatic and hydrologic changes occur in an ecosystem, amphibians are often the first to react. Their thin skin makes them vulnerable to temperature increases, chemical pollutants, disease, and radiation. The combinations of pollutants, habitat fragmentation and development in urban areas have had a negative impact on amphibian populations. In the Portland Metro area, everything from mutations of extra legs to complete absence of native amphibians has been documented.

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Light in the Forest: Poole Slough

TWC is improving forest health and wildlife habitat quality of the forest lands of our Upper Yaquina Preserve, in Poole Slough, Newport Oregon. This exciting project that began in June includes thinning the over abundant conifers and creating snags and wildlife trees in portions of the preserve forest lands. By removing some Douglas-fir, other conifers

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What Does Sea Level Rise Look Like?

Every year in early winter, high tides in Oregon are higher than usual. These extreme high tides, commonly called “King Tides,” occur when the moon is closest to the Earth. These unusual tides are a great tool to understanding how estuaries may respond to rising sea levels and setting restoration goals for TWC estuarine preserves

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Beaver Creek Marsh

The Beaver Creek Natural Area Partnership consists of a series of conservation actions among multiple partners in the Beaver Creek watershed, which is about seven miles south of Newport on the Central Oregon Coast. Beaver Creek is a tributary to the Pacific Ocean situated between the larger Yaquina and Alsea River estuaries. The Beaver Creek

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